[help needed] universal ECU connector?

Hardware inside and outside of the ECU
chingon
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Re: universal ECU connector?

Post by chingon » Wed Jun 03, 2015 3:42 am

revisiting the cinch:
Image
http://forum.jbperf.com/viewtopic.php?f ... 6&start=20


catalog:
http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/643/trans-ca ... 473267.pdf

seems like 60 pins is the limit (but they offer 'custom' multi pin applications (pg 19) and a blank header plate (page 9 if you decided to use your own header)

looks like ~25 for enclosure, ~25 for header, ~25 for SHS male header (for harness)...the ruggedized headers seem cheaper oddly enough.

or ~25 for enclosure, ~10 for blank header plate, ~25 for 75 pin megasquirt harness males...don't know how much pcb headers for those are.

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kb1gtt
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Re: universal ECU connector?

Post by kb1gtt » Wed Jun 03, 2015 9:44 am

The Cinch enclosure requires a special tool to open. Using a small flat screw driver tends to destroy the PCB connector or the enclosure. I guess that's OK for a production device, but less friendly to a DIY kind of thing where people are likely to open the device multiple times.
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chingon
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Re: universal ECU connector?

Post by chingon » Fri Jun 05, 2015 2:40 am

kb1gtt wrote:The Cinch enclosure requires a special tool to open. Using a small flat screw driver tends to destroy the PCB connector or the enclosure. I guess that's OK for a production device, but less friendly to a DIY kind of thing where people are likely to open the device multiple times.
it's not trivial either;
http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/1256159.pdf
https://www.google.com/search?q=599+11+ ... 8914895090
https://www.google.com/search?q=599+11+ ... +11+11+612

stefanst
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Automotive connectors standardization?

Post by stefanst » Sun May 28, 2017 1:42 am

I find myself repeatedly making new connections that may have to be disconnected at some future point in time. For connections in areas protected from the elements I have been successfully using MOLEX Minifit Jr. connectors http://www.mouser.com/new/molex/molex-m ... onnectors/

But then we have those areas that are exposed to the elements, mostly inside the engine bay, which require protection. I like the Deutsch DT or DTM series. http://www.mouser.com/new/TE-Deutsch/te ... onnectors/
I haven't used them yet, but they seem to be well designed and not overly expensive. My only caveat is that it appears I need to get a new and, presumably, expensive crimping tool to work with them.

Does anybody know of a similar connection system that uses the more traditional crimping tools?

I'm aware of the Delphi Weather Pack connectors and still have quite a few of them left, but I don't think they are appropriate for use for engine wiring- they are OK for lights etc.

Flying
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Re: universal ECU connector?

Post by Flying » Sun May 28, 2017 3:11 am

Weatherpack is used often in DIY motorcycle wiring and USDM OEM engine bay applications. I think it would work fine for daily use.
Pretty much any deutsch connector is suitable for even motorsport use and you absolutely can't go wrong with them if you have the money.

I'm partial towards the smaller molex connectors as well as common Japanese open barrel connectors (Hitachi, Sumitomo, Denso, etc.). They come in sealed varieties and use generic open barrel crimp profiles.

Here's my shopping catalogue for the common Japanese stuff:
https://www.bmotorsports.com
http://www.automotiveconnectors.com
https://www.corsa-technic.com

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kb1gtt
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Re: universal ECU connector?

Post by kb1gtt » Sun May 28, 2017 11:03 am

I always suggest ratchet style OEM crimp tools. They are typically $300 to $500, but without them you are exposed to many issues in electrical connectors. Remember that electrical fires suck. Also there are procedures for inspecting your final crimp connection. For DIY folks who don't do this every day, I suggest finding the procedure and inspecting every connection. Typically that means after it has been crimped, you measure it with some calipers and verify that it has not been over or under squished. If it has been over or under squished, your ratchet style tool can typically be adjusted to increase or decrease the crimp forces. I suggest the ratchet style for this reason, it is very difficult for non-ratchet styles to get the proper crimp force.

In industrial land, the mate-n-lok is a very common low cost connector. It is typically used in dry conditions, and can be used in wet areas with additional components. The $/connection is much lower than the above mentioned connections, as well 1 crimp tool allows both lower cost dry connections as well as weather resistant connections. Here's a quick list of key features for this connector.
-- Gold plated or TIN plated contacts
-- There are options for PCB mount, harness mount. bulkhead mount, and strain relief shells.
-- Different shell sizes are available to make for easy to see keying, and to keeps costs low if you don't need extra connections.
-- If you have many connectors, you can get additional keying options by changing male and female pins, such that 2 shells that are the same can not be connected.
-- Contacts can handle 10AWG to 30AWG wires, 600V, and up to 19A.
-- Optional weather resistant seal's
-- Lots of engineering details including vibration, shock, wire pull forces, salt spray, contact resistance over time, amp ratings for different shell configurations, etc.

See pages 169 and 170 in the below datasheet about mate-n-lok connectors.
http://www.te.com/commerce/DocumentDeli ... DocLang=EN

See Product Specifications
http://www.te.com/commerce/DocumentDeli ... DocLang=JP

See Application Specification
http://www.te.com/commerce/DocumentDeli ... DocType=SS

See Selection Charts
http://www.te.com/commerce/DocumentDeli ... 7F640582-1

See crimp inspection (you can typically do this with normal calipers. However they show fancy micrometers)
http://www.te.com/commerce/DocumentDeli ... DocType=SS
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